Any Other Varieties

The AOV section includes all varieties of mice that have not been seperately classified in previous sections. Generally, these include all ticked and shaded varieties. The term "pink eye" covers all shades of pink or red.

Note: A detailed breakdown of the allocation of points for each variety is given in the printed version of the Breed Standards and is provided to all new members on joining the National Mouse Club.

Image Colour Description
Agouti Eye Black. The Agouti shall be a rich brown or golden hue with even dark or black ticking all through. Undercolour black. The belly shall be a golden brown, ticked as on top and the feet shall match the body in colour and ticking.
Cinnamon Eye Black. The Cinnamon shall be a rich golden tan, lustrous in colour and level throughout top and belly, with rich brown ticking clearly defined. Undercolour slate grey. No black ticking.
Silver Agouti Eye Black. This variety is like the normal or Golden Agouti except the golden brown pigment is replaced by silvery grey. Colour to be bright silvery grey evenly ticked with black. Undercolour deep slate. Belly to be silvery grey, as close as possible to the top. Feet to match top.
Certificate 1969: B Makin
Sable Eye black. The top colour shall be a rich dark brown, as dark as possible, from nose to tail root; the belly colour to be as rich a golden tan as possible and the shading from top to belly to be gradual, even and pleasing, with no line of demarcation nor any blotch, patch, ticking or streakiness. There should be no white hairs whatsoever.
Originator: W Maxey
Marten Sable Eye black. Top colour shall be a rich dark sepia from nose to tail, shading off to a paler colour on lower jaws, sides and flanks, blending to be gradual; belly white, white ticking on flanks and rump to be considered an added beauty. Faults: Light noses, blotches or streaks.
Certificate: V Stephens
Pearl Eye black. A pearl mouse shall be of the palest silver, shading to a whitish undercolour. Each hair shall be delicately tipped with grey or black and carried out top and belly.
Certificate 1935: Mrs E D Blowers
Argente Eye pink. An Argente mouse shall be of a delicately blended shade of light fawn and silver, as the self silver, level throughout and the two colours so evenly intermingled as to give the appearance of shot silk. The undercolour to be blue, as dark as possible in shade. The belly to be a golden fawn and as similar to the top as possible. Feet to match top.
Certificate 1935: L Madeley
Silvered Mice Colour
Greys: the ground colour should be as black as possible. Eye black
Browns: to be a rich golden brown as in the Agouti. Eye black. 
Fawns: to be a deep bright orange. Eye Pink or black.

Undercolour
Greys: to be a rich blue-black.
Browns: to be a blue-black.
Fawns: to be a bright orange.

The silvering should be even throughout, carried well onto the feet.

Silver Grey mice are recognised in three shades, namely, Dark, Medium and Light.

First Silver Grey Originator: Mr Pollock about 1900
Probable proper Silver Grey Originator: Mr Russell 1912
Silver Brown Originator: Miss E Rhodes 1901
Chinchilla Eye black. The mouse shall be as near as possible to the colour of a Chinchilla with slate-blue undercolour and intermediate shade of pearl grey. Hairs to be evenly tipped with black. Colour of feet on inside white, with remainder of foot the same colour as body - as in the standard for Tans. Belly white.
Certificate 1933: Dr J N Pickard
Argente Creme Eye pink. An Argente Creme mouse shall be a delicate blend of deep cream and silver. The undercolour to be an extremely pale blue. Feet the same colour as body. Belly White.
Certificate 1967: B J Cooke
Astrex An Astrex mouse shall have a coat as curly as possible and like the Astrex rabbit. Whiskers must be curly. The colour may be that of any standard variety.
Certificate 1936: A Tuck
Silver Fox Silver Fox: Eye Black. A Silver Fox shall be recognised in black, blue, chocolate and lilac top colour. Feet sides and rump only to be ticked evenly with white hairs. Belly white.
Certificate 1936: DR J N Pickard
Seal Point
Siamese
Eyes any colour. Body colour medium beige.
Shadings: Gradually shaded over saddle and hind quarters, merging gradually with body colour and being darkest at tail root as seen in the Siamese cat. The belly should be as near as possible in colour and shadings.
Points: Seal coloured points shall be present in muzzle, ears, feet, tail and tail root. There should not be a definite or distinct line of demarcation but rather a harmonious balance between body colour, shadings and points. There should not be any blotches, streaks or white hairs.
Certificate 1968: Mrs D Cooper
Blue Point
Siamese
Eyes any colour. Body colour silvery blue (bluer the better).
Shadings: Gradually shaded over saddle and hind quarters, merging gradually with body colour and being darkest at tail root. The belly should be as near as possible in colour and shadings. White belly to be penalised.
Points: There should not be a definite or distinct line of demarcation but rather a toning in or merging with the remainder of the coat. At all times there should be a harmonious balance between body colour, shading and points. There should not be any blotches, streaks or white hairs.
Himalayan Eye Black or Red. All markings to be as Himalayan rabbit. Colour of markings recognised in any standard colour. Body colour as white as possible.
Certificate 1970: E Kitchen
Longhaired The longhaired mouse shall have a coat as long as possible combined with density and to be silky in texture. The colour maybe that of any standard variety.
Certificate 1969: A D Jones
Brindle The brindle mouse shall have streaks, bars and numerous little areas of any colour over a diluted background. These markings shall be evenly distributed over the mouse including the face and belly. Large blotches of solid colour or white background to be considered a fault. Central demarcation lines along spine, face and belly permissible. Eye any colour.
Certificate 1992: S Haswel
Splashed Eyes black or pink. Splashed mice are to exhibit shades of any colour, splashed heavily and evenly over the top of the mouse, with as much as possible under, on a lighter background colour. Heavy splashing on head an added beauty. Dorsal, facial and ventral lines are permissible but not preferred over those without. Points and patches of solid colour to be considered a fault.
Certificate: Heather McLean and David Bumford, 2012.